are canonizations infallible orthodox christianity

are canonizations infallible orthodox christianity插图

Not infallible
The judgment of canonization isnot infalliblein itself,because it lacks the conditions for infallibility,starting from the fact the canonization does not have as its direct or explicit aim,a truth of the Faith or morals contained in Revelation,but only a fact indirectly connected with dogma,without being properly-speaking a “dogmatic fact.

Is canonization infallible?

The infallibility of this action is accepted by the majority of Catholic theologians but has not itself been the subject of a definition. Thus, with the act of canonization the Pope, so to speak, imposes a precept upon the faithful by saying that the universal Church must henceforth keep the memory of the canonized with pious devotion.

What is the object of canonization?

Second, the object of canonization is that the person declared as a saint is now in heaven and can be invoked as an intercessor by all the faithful. The infallibility of this action is accepted by the majority of Catholic theologians but has not itself been the subject of a definition.

Is canonization a matter of faith or morals?

The canonization, much less the miracle that supports it, cannot be a matter of faith because that refers to Revelation, and the period of Revelation is over: There is nothing more to be revealed before Jesus returns. So it must be under morals that his infallibility lies.

What is the difference between beatification and canonization?

With a canonization, the Pope mandates (rather than permits, as is the case of beatification) that a saint be venerated in the Church’s liturgy and especially with the Eucharistic celebration in his honor.

What is the opinion of the majority of theologians that canonizations done by the Holy Father enter within the?

The Congregation for the Causes of the Saints: “it is the opinion of the majority of theologians that canonizations done by the Holy Father enter within the limits of his infallible teaching authority.” [2006, letter to the author]

When the Pope declares a previous Pope to be a saint, what does he do?

When the Pope declares a previous Pope to be a Saint, especially in that case though not only in that case, he exercises divine authority from Christ. Even if it were possible for such a canonization of a past Roman Pontiff to be in error, such that the past Pope were not as holy as he was thought to be, the exercise of the Keys by any Roman Pontiff are free from grave errors on both doctrine and discipline. And so the argument that says the recent Pope Saints were not really Saints, therefore, listen to these accusations that they erred gravely, is itself an argument contrary to dogma and therefore heretical.

Is papal canonization infallible?

Prior to Vatican II certainly, and for the most part prior to Pope Francis, conservatives held that Papal Canonizations are infallible. And this is considered to be the majority opinion of theologians by the CCS:

What does "technically" mean in the consistory?

By "technically" I mean that the cardinals have usually already given their opinion and the canonization has already been decided. Thus, nowadays the consistory is a kind of legal fiction in which everybody ceremoniously votes "yes." At the end of the consistory the Holy Father accepts the opinion of the cardinals and announces the date or dates on which the canonizations will take place.

Why is the consistory considered a public consistory?

The reason is that the decisions emanating from the consistory are juridical and not theological in nature. A public consistory is a gathering of cardinals convoked by the Holy Father for a specific purpose.

What are the four kinds of dogmatic theology?

According to Ludwig Ott’s classical manual of dogmatic theology there are four kinds of teaching involved in this exercise of infallibility: Theological conclusions derived from formally revealed truths by aid of the natural truth of reason; historical facts on the determination of which the certainty of a truth of Revelation depends (so- called "dogmatic facts," for example, "Is Pope N. truly the duly elected and rightful successor to the throne of Peter?"); natural truths of reason which are intimately connected with Revelation (e.g., the morality of certain medical procedures); the canonization of saints (see Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, p. 299).

What is the object of canonization?

Second, the object of canonization is that the person declared as a saint is now in heaven and can be invoked as an intercessor by all the faithful.

Is canonization a dogma?

This argument therefore would place the infallibility of canonization within the area of faith insofar as the venerability of saints is a dogma grounded in Revelation, and the determination as to which persons can be thus venerated is a necessary exercise of infallible authority.

Is the Pope infallible?

The Pope is infallible in matters of faith and morals. The canonization, much less the miracle that supports it, cannot be a matter of faith because that refers to Revelation, and the period of Revelation is over: There is nothing more to be revealed before Jesus returns.

Is the saint a model of virtue?

Although the saint is proposed as a model of virtues and Christian living, it is not the specific object of canonization. For example, it is quite possible that a martyr show heroic virtue in the face of death without necessarily having lived all the virtues to an exemplary degree. Nor does canonization make the saints immune from the judgment of history insofar as hindsight might show that some of their external actions proved to be unwise or had negative consequences.

Markie Boy Looking East, Moving Slow Supporter

No, they are not infallible. No single human is infallible (except Jesus). We must look to the consistent testimony of the Church Fathers, along with the ecumenical councils, and liturgical texts. They are very useful – even critical (especially the Church Fathers), but look at their writings from within the context of the Church.

Markie Boy Looking East, Moving Slow Supporter

I modified the original post – what I was really asking is if the actual Canonization of the saint is considered infallible – not if proclamations of the saints themselves were infallible.

prodromos Senior Veteran Supporter

This is a more interesting question! There are a few types of possible errors – you accidentally canonize somebody that didn’t exist, for instance, or you canonize somebody that does exist and they were actually bad, or you canonize somebody and it turns out that you really meant a different person. I think the second error is much less likely.

Not David Orthodox Improving on the Faith

This is a more interesting question! There are a few types of possible errors – you accidentally canonize somebody that didn’t exist, for instance, or you canonize somebody that does exist and they were actually bad, or you canonize somebody and it turns out that you really meant a different person. I think the second error is much less likely.

buzuxi02 Veteran

I modified the original post – what I was really asking is if the actual Canonization of the saint is considered infallible – not if proclamations of the saints themselves were infallible.

prodromos Senior Veteran Supporter

They are spectacular creatures of the Most High God (saints), but what makes them even more spectacular is that through all of their feats they were still human, and fallible under the Most High God. Even a "morally perfect" person can be fallible.

ArmyMatt Regular Member Supporter

EDIT: Orthodox History visits this as well if you don’t want to look at that site: Is the St. Peter the Aleut story true? – Orthodox History