are evangelical christians contiuing trump support

are evangelical christians contiuing trump support插图

Is it worth it for evangelical Christians to stand behind Trump?

Evangelical Christians thought lining up behind a Trump was worth it; they couldn’t be more wrong. The cost-benefit analysis that led them to support him as the “lesser of two evils” in 2016 didn’t factor in the long-term damage he, in fact, is still doing.

Will evangelicalism survive the Trump era?

Political tensions in the pews have calmed, and another survey shows leaders’ Trump support yielded more positives than negatives for evangelicals. While evangelicalism at large looks to have survived the Trump era without major fissures, division remains for some Black Christians.

How many evangelical voters voted for Trump in 2020?

Evangelical voters have shown strong support for President Trump over the last four years, and 8 in 10 voted for him in the 2020 election as well. Evangelical voters have shown strong support for President Trump over the last four years, and 8 in 10 voted for him in the 2020 election as well.

Is there an agreement between Trump and the Christian religion?

The bible was a prop. The pastor of another Church, which Trump claims as his own, admitted that not once has the “liar-in-chief” ever crossed the threshold of the building. Evangelical leaders continue to support the devil’s disciple. There is a mutual agreement between Trump and the Christian religion. It is simple.

What did evangelicals fear in the 1970s?

As Daniel K. Williams writes in The Politics of the Cross, “ [J]ust as some evangelical supporters of Republican conservatism in the 1970s and 1980s conflated white middle-class suburban fears about rising crime rates and social welfare costs with Christian principles, so some evangelical supporters of the contemporary Republican Party have conflated white working-class rural fears about immigration, gun control, and cultural change with Christianity.

What does Campbell say about exposing people to one story?

During an interview with Religion News Service, Campbell said that just exposing people to one such story was “enough to push a sizable number of people away from holding a religious affiliation. That’s one story at one point in time, and we can get that effect,” he said. “Imagine what happens when people are exposed to hundreds of stories over many, many years. It would only reinforce that idea that religion and the Republican Party go together, and that if you’re not sympathetic to the Republican Party, you don’t want anything to do with religion.”

Does Trump exist in a vacuum?

The good news is that Trump does not exist in a vacuum. Others are seeking to reach disparate communities and separate the gospel message from toxic politics. In this regard, Luis Palau and his successors (people like Christian leaders including New York City pastor Tim Keller and president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission Russell Moore) provide a ray of hope and a hopeful alternative.

Did evangelicals support Trump?

Evangelical Christians thought lining up behind a Trump was worth it; they couldn’t be more wrong. The cost- benefit analysis that led them to support him as the “lesser of two evils” in 2016 didn’t factor in the long- term damage he, in fact, is still doing.

Who wrote the experiment Secular Surge?

According to political scientists David E. Campbell and Geoffrey C. Layman of the University of Notre Dame and John C. Green of the University of Akron, authors of Secular Surge: A New Fault Line in American Politics, this corruption is happening already. They designed an experiment to test whether the rise of Americans who identify as “nonreligious” resulted from backlash against the Christian Right. The experiment involved first asking participants about their views on faith and then exposing them to news stories that mix religion and politics; the experiment concluded by again asking participants about their religious identity.

How many evangelicals voted for Trump in 2016?

Approximately 80 percent of white evangelicals voted for Trump in 2016 and again in 2020, according to polling data. Trump’s evangelical allies, convened by friend and televangelist Paula White, included leaders like First Baptist Dallas pastor Robert Jeffress, Gateway Church pastor Robert Morris, and Samaritan’s Purse president Franklin Graham.

What percentage of evangelicals support Trump?

The majority of evangelicals (57%) believe their support of Trump in 2020 “showed moral courage to try and achieve policies and actions consistent with evangelical Christian values,” and more than a third of Americans overall agreed.

Why do evangelicals support Trump?

The Heart and Mind Strategies poll found 64 percent of Black evangelicals identified with the sentiment that “evangelical leaders’ obsessive support of Trump coupled with his personal failings does more harm than good, tarnishing numerous causes.” An identical percentage of white evangelicals (64%) agreed that they supported Trump because “while not a perfect person, he championed matters important to faithful Christians.”

What is the church breaking point in 2020?

Divides in many churches hit a breaking point in 2020, with heightened political polarization during Trump’s reelection campaign and pastors struggling to maintain unity over pandemic responses. In the aftermath of the contested election and the riot at the US Capitol, pastors even found themselves in conversations around conspiracy theories, fear, and truth.

Where is the remnants of tension?

The remnants of tension are evident at congregations such as Seattle’s Downtown Cornerstone Church, where pastor Adam Sinnett has been surprised “at how challenging it is to really cultivate unity amidst [our] political differences.”

Where is David Roach?

David Roach is a freelance reporter for CT and the pastor of Shiloh Baptist Church in Saraland, Alabama.

Where is Antioch Baptist Church?

Members of Antioch Baptist Church in Fairfax Station, Virginia, are “deeply, deeply concerned” over appearances the convention is “in bed with a particular [political] party,” he said.

How does Trump promote religious freedom?

As a matter of rhetoric, Trump has a strong record in advancing religious freedom around the world. He has given numerous speeches championing religious liberty, hosted a Global Call to Protect Religious Freedom event, and two White House summits on the subject. He brought victims of global religious persecution to the White House. He appointed Sam Brownback as the ambassador for religious freedom in order to spread the word around the world. He pressured Turkey to release the imprisoned Christian pastor Andrew Brunson. So he tells his evangelical supporters, “I don’t think any president has taken it as seriously as me.”

What happened to the Johnson Amendment?

What actually did happen, in the real world, is that Trump proposed repealing the Johnson amendment and the Republican controlled Congress failed to do it. When Trump had to decide what issues to emphasize during budget negotiations, he did not aggressively push the Johnson amendment repeal. The Johnson amendment is still on the books.

What did Trump say to Mohammad bin Salman?

Trump told Mohammad bin Salman, “You’ve done a really spectacular job.”. The president justified softening his position by pointing to Saudi Arabia making a large arms purchase from the United States: “ This is a record amount of money.

Why did Sam Brownback become the ambassador for religious freedom?

He appointed Sam Brownback as the ambassador for religious freedom in order to spread the word around the world. He pressured Turkey to release the imprisoned Christian pastor Andrew Brunson. So he tells his evangelical supporters, “I don’t think any president has taken it as seriously as me.”.

What is the Russian government harassing?

The Russian government has also harassed Muslims, Pentecostals, evangelicals, Mormons, atheists, and Hare Krishnas. There is no record of Trump pressing Putin about his violation of religious freedoms. Lie #3: Everyone hates you. When Trump wants to fire up his base, he doesn’t just encourage them to hate other people.

Why did the Little Sisters of the Poor sue?

The Little Sisters of the Poor sued to block the rule. And when he became president, Donald Trump issued an executive order reversing the Obama policy. He gave the Sisters the good news that he was thereby “ending the attacks on your religious liberty” and “your long ordeal.”.

Why did the Saudi government behead 37 people?

Last April, the Saudi government held a mass beheading of 37 Saudis as part of an action against the country’s Shi’a minority. The chair of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, Tenzin Dorjee, declared, “The Saudi government’s execution of minority Shi’a Muslims on the basis of their religious identity and peaceful activism is not only shocking, but also directly contradicts the government’s official narrative of working toward greater modernization and improving religious freedom conditions.”

What did evangelicals fear in the 1970s?

As Daniel K. Williams writes in The Politics of the Cross, “ [J]ust as some evangelical supporters of Republican conservatism in the 1970s and 1980s conflated white middle-class suburban fears about rising crime rates and social welfare costs with Christian principles, so some evangelical supporters of the contemporary Republican Party have conflated white working-class rural fears about immigration, gun control, and cultural change with Christianity.

What does Campbell say about exposing people to one story?

During an interview with Religion News Service, Campbell said that just exposing people to one such story was “enough to push a sizable number of people away from holding a religious affiliation. That’s one story at one point in time, and we can get that effect,” he said. “Imagine what happens when people are exposed to hundreds of stories over many, many years. It would only reinforce that idea that religion and the Republican Party go together, and that if you’re not sympathetic to the Republican Party, you don’t want anything to do with religion.”

Does Trump exist in a vacuum?

The good news is that Trump does not exist in a vacuum. Others are seeking to reach disparate communities and separate the gospel message from toxic politics. In this regard, Luis Palau and his successors (people like Christian leaders including New York City pastor Tim Keller and president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission Russell Moore) provide a ray of hope and a hopeful alternative.

Did evangelicals support Trump?

Evangelical Christians thought lining up behind a Trump was worth it; they couldn’t be more wrong. The cost- benefit analysis that led them to support him as the “lesser of two evils” in 2016 didn’t factor in the long- term damage he, in fact, is still doing.

Who wrote the experiment Secular Surge?

According to political scientists David E. Campbell and Geoffrey C. Layman of the University of Notre Dame and John C. Green of the University of Akron, authors of Secular Surge: A New Fault Line in American Politics, this corruption is happening already. They designed an experiment to test whether the rise of Americans who identify as “nonreligious” resulted from backlash against the Christian Right. The experiment involved first asking participants about their views on faith and then exposing them to news stories that mix religion and politics; the experiment concluded by again asking participants about their religious identity.

Who is culpable for sending other human beings?

For believers who take John 14:6 seriously and literally, anyone who undermines the church’s ability to credibly evangelize to a fallen world is culpable for sending other human beings—people who might have otherwise have been receptive to a salvation message—to an eternal damnation.

For Trump, Conservative Catholics Are The New Evangelicals

The loss of white Catholic votes for Trump in the Upper Midwest may have been somewhat offset, however, by an apparent increase in Hispanic Catholic support for Trump in places like Florida.

In Pennsylvania, Catholic Voters Are Targeted By Both Sides

"I think the Democrats should stop thinking about white evangelicals entirely," Burge says. "And I think the Republicans should take them for granted. At some point, it’s like, what can you do to make them change — on the Democratic side or the Republican side?"

American Christianity Must Reckon With Legacy Of White Supremacy, Author Says

The phenomenon of Americans leaving the faith traditions in which they were raised has been well documented in recent years. The share of the U.S. population and the electorate who list their religious affiliation as "none" is growing steadily.

What to Do?

However, it may be possible to limit the damage if we refuse to continue supporting him. Perhaps rejecting Trump now will resonate with some individuals. In the Doug Jones/Roy Moore Alabama Senate race in 2017, there was a fear that Christians would overlook the problems connected to Moore and send him to the Senate. Instead they stayed home. They could not support Jones, but neither were they willing to back Moore. That removed the potential of Moore being yet another cultural noose around our neck. Perhaps with a noticeable drop of evangelical support and a Trump loss, we can lose some of the cultural baggage of the linking of Christians to Trump. But we should not be naïve about that possibility either. The damage may have already been done.

What is the danger of Trump?

B eyond connecting Christians to some of the more unsavory parts of Trump, the danger of Trump is also the danger of division within the Christian church. Trump is especially unpopular among young people and people of color. There is evidence that even among evangelicals, younger persons are less likely to support Trump. At a time where it has become more important for Christians to hang together and deal with anti-Christian attitudes, President Trump has created even more division. To be sure, the division is our fault more than it is Trump’s fault. The way some Christians have placed Trump on a pedestal has created a divisive situation considering the way he freely dehumanizes others.

What happens if Christians do not push back on Trump?

If Christians do not push back on the disturbing attributes of Trump, then we will own those attributes. For example, if enough Christians accept the perceptions of the leader in the previous paragraph, then our faith will become known for not caring about the race-baiting statements of our president. This will translate into Christians not caring about racism and people of color. The argument that we must vote for Trump as the less-bad option will not save us from being labeled racist if we do not challenge Trump’s race-baiting.

Is evangelical support of Trump toxic?

But in a very practical manner, evangelical support of Trump is making our culture even more toxic for Christians. For utilitarian reasons alone, Christians should not throw their support behind our current president.

Is Christianophobia real?

I want to say to my Christian friends, especially the evangelical ones who most support Trump: I hear you. Christianophobia is real. I have studied it and debated with those who do not believe it exists. Trump has promised to protect Christians. The seeking of political control is one way to try to deal with Christianophobia. But it is the wrong way.

What were the problems that the Jews needed to address?

And what were the problems that the Jews needed to address? They were a nation in the middle of other nations that did not like them. The idea was that a king could fight for them and they were jealous of the kings in other nations. And the problem of looking to political leaders was not limited to recruiting Saul as their first king. The children of Israel not only sought to rely on other Jews for the projection and leadership they wanted. They also looked to powerful foreign nations for protection.

Is it fair to place the entire responsibility upon those defending Trump?

It would not be fair to place the entire responsibility upon those defending Trump. But it should not surprise us that a political leader who traffics in divisive rhetoric would have followers who spread division. I have heard again and again that some Christians not only fail to critique the dehumanizing comments of Trump, but they also like him because of that “tough man” approach. They often say that there is a need to go to “war” against progressives and that Trump’s hostility towards those progressives is a welcome change over other, more civil political leaders.