are taoism and christianity compatible

are taoism and christianity compatible插图

Taoism is not compatible
Taoism is not compatiblewith Christianity. Here are some major differences: In Taoism,the Tao is the source of everything and the ultimate principle underlying reality. Taoist theology emphasizes the formlessness and unknowable nature of the Tao,and the primacy of the “Way” rather than the concept of a personal God.

What are similarities between Taoism and Christianity?

To begin with, the creed of Christianity is based on the belief in the benevolent and omnipotent God, which is considered to be the Creator of the mankind. In contrast, Taoism denies the existence of any God. Unlike Christians, they believe that all matters and spirits are eternal and have no creator.

What are the principles of Taoism?

What are the principles of Taoism?Desire begets suffering. The master of Taoism says that those who don’t desire aren’t frustrated. …Assuming love as a tool for growth. Taoism seeks to foster nonviolence. …Wu Wei. The expression Wu Wei means learning to flow with the nature of things and with minimal effort. …Know yourself. This is perhaps one of life’s great challenges. …

Are Taoism and Confucianism truly religions?

Both Taoism and Confucianism cannot clearly be explained as a religion with certain doctrines and rituals as other well –known religions. As religious and social forces, they have coexisted for centuries in China and have spread to other Asian regions.

Is Christianity and Shintoism the same or different?

Some similarities between Shintoism and Christianity are that their leadership is organized about the same way. Shintoism is organized by Shinto Priests and Christianity is organized by the pope. They both have a holy book, Christianity has the bible and Shintoism has the Kuijiki. Both religions believe in purification rituals, for Christianity its baptism and for Shintoism its just called purification.

What did Lao Tzu say about water?

According to Lao Tzu, man should model himself after Tao. Since water so closely resembles the workings of Tao, the Taoist sage could draw certain lessons for human behavior by carefully observing the behavior of water. Thus, the sage might observe the beneficial qualities of water, and that these qualities are combined with water’s natural tendency to seek the lowest places. It may have been just such observations that led Lao Tzu to conclude his classic thus:

How many chapters are there in Tao Te Ching?

Lao Tzu consented, retired for a few days, and returned with a brief work called Tao Te Ching, “The Classic of the Way and its Power.” {2} It “contains 81 short chapters describing the meaning of Tao and how one should live according to the Tao.” {3}.

Where did Taoism originate?

The philosophy of Taoism is traditionally held to have originated in China with a man named Lao Tzu. Although some scholars doubt whether he was an actual historical figure, tradition dates his life from 604-517 B.C. The story goes that Lao Tzu, “saddened by his people’s disinclination to cultivate the natural goodness he advocated”, {1} decided to head west and abandon civilization. As he was leaving, the gatekeeper asked if he would write down his teachings for the benefit of society. Lao Tzu consented, retired for a few days, and returned with a brief work called Tao Te Ching, “The Classic of the Way and its Power.” {2} It “contains 81 short chapters describing the meaning of Tao and how one should live according to the Tao.” {3}

What does Tao mean in English?

The term Tao is typically translated into English as “way”, but it can also be translated as “path,” “road,” or “course.”. Interestingly, however, one scholar cites James Legge as stating that the term might even be understood “in a triple sense as at once ‘being’, ‘reason’, and ‘speech’.” {4}.

What is the closest analog to Tao?

Another way to describe the indescribable is to say what Tao most closely resembles. The closest analogue to Tao in the physical world is water.

What is the object of Taoism?

The chief object of philosophical Taoism “is to live in a way that conserves life’s vitality by not expending it in useless, draining ways, the chief of which are friction and conflict.” {9} One does this by living in harmony with the Tao, or Way, of all things: the Way of nature, of society, and of oneself.

How many camps does Huston Smith divide into?

Throughout history, Taoist ideas have been expressed in various ways. Huston Smith, in The World’s Religions, divides Taoist thought into three different, yet related, camps–the philosophical, “vitalizing”, and religious Taoisms. {8}

Why did the Taoists distrust debate?

Taoists distrust debate as a means of ascertaining truth. As a light-hearted corrective to Confucian thought in the same era, they sought to reconfigure the role of reason. Chuang Tzu said: Suppose I am arguing with you, and you get the better of me.

What is the meaning of water in Taoism?

Taoists use water as a metaphor for describing the power in their way of life. Water is malleable . Yet, it is powerful.

When did Taoism begin?

With beginnings at approximately 500 B.C., Taoism features a poetic willingness to embrace the unexpected and optimistically wait for positive outcomes. The first step in Taoist thought is the realization that once one names something as worthy of desire or attainment, then a person experiences a sort of confinement of one’s own making. If one has this limitation, then how can one arrive at the optimal destination? Thus, Taoists distrust the action of labeling, doubting one’s ability to properly distinguish between the good and bad or knowledge and wisdom.

What happens when you believe in labels?

As soon as one believes a label, one starts on a tense journey, feeling obligated to maintain the image. For example, if you are known as a genius and you absorb that label, you will feel the pressure to act like a genius. Clinging to the desire of fulfilling a label confines a person. Smash the labels and a person is free.

What is self deception?

Another self-deception occurs when a person chooses to embody the labels placed upon her by others.

What does Esther say to his brothers?

Yet through all the suffering and injustice, he remained faithful, saying to his brothers, “You meant it for harm, God meant it for good.”. Genesis 50:20. Esther’s life was unconventional, as well, with high and low points.

What is the denouement of the tale?

The denouement of the tale is when the stallion brings home a wild horse and the farmer’s son sustains a fracture trying to tame the horse and avoids being conscripted to war and thus demonstrates the blindness one truly has in assessing each circumstance.

What is the main object of Taoism?

The chief object of philosophical Taoism "is to live in a way that conserves life’s vitality by not expending it in useless, draining ways, the chief of which are friction and conflict." {9} One does this by living in harmony with the Tao, or Way, of all things: the Way of nature, of society, and of oneself. Taoist philosophers have a particular concept characterizing action that is in harmony with the Tao. They call it wu-wei. Literally this means "non-action", but practically speaking it means taking no action which is contrary to nature. Thus, "action in the mode of wu-wei is action in which friction–in interpersonal relationships, in intra-psychic conflict, and in relation to nature–is reduced to the minimum." {10}

What did Lao Tzu say about water?

According to Lao Tzu, man should model himself after Tao. Since water so closely resembles the workings of Tao, the Taoist sage could draw certain lessons for human behavior by carefully observing the behavior of water. Thus, the sage might observe the beneficial qualities of water, and that these qualities are combined with water’s natural tendency to seek the lowest places. It may have been just such observations that led Lao Tzu to conclude his classic thus:

What is Chuang Tzu’s moral philosophy?

This distinction is more clearly seen when one considers Chuang Tzu’s moral philosophy. Chuang Tzu embraced a doctrine of moral relativism; that is, he did not believe that there was really any ultimate distinction between what men call "right" and "wrong", or "good" and "evil." He writes:

Where did Taoism originate?

The philosophy of Taoism is traditionally held to have originated in China with a man named Lao Tzu. Although some scholars doubt whether he was an actual historical figure, tradition dates his life from 604-517 B.C. The story goes that Lao Tzu, "saddened by his people’s disinclination to cultivate the natural goodness he advocated", {1} decided to head west and abandon civilization. As he was leaving, the gatekeeper asked if he would write down his teachings for the benefit of society. Lao Tzu consented, retired for a few days, and returned with a brief work called Tao Te Ching, "The Classic of the Way and its Power." {2} It "contains 81 short chapters describing the meaning of Tao and how one should live according to the Tao." {3}

What does Tao mean in English?

The term Tao is typically translated into English as "way", but it can also be translated as "path," "road," or "course." Interestingly, however, one scholar cites James Legge as stating that the term might even be understood "in a triple sense as at once ‘being’, ‘reason’, and ‘speech’." {4}

How many camps are there in the Taoist religion?

Throughout history, Taoist ideas have been expressed in various ways. Huston Smith, in The World’s Religions, divides Taoist thought into three different, yet related, camps–the philosophical, "vitalizing", and religious Taoisms. {8}

What is the way of heaven?

The Way of Heaven is to benefit others and not to injure. The Way of the sage is to act but not to compete. {18}

How is Taoism different from Christianity?

considering what is right and what is wrong), since: In Taoism every concept appears immediately with their opposite. In christianity, there is God, and be apart from God.

What does Taoism believe?

Taoism argues that individuality is ultimately an illusion, in Christianity individual souls are promised eternal life. Taoism is very skeptical of how much we may hope to to grasp as rational knowledge, for Christianity the logos is key.

What is the Taoist paradox of wei-wu-wei?

David Loy writes in Nonduality: A Study of Comparative Philosophy: "The first section [of Chapter 3] argues that the Taoist paradox of wei-wu-wei(the action of non-action) is a description of such nondual action. It is highly significant that the same paradox is found in the other two nondualist traditions, clearly enunciated in the Bhagavad-gitaand more fully developed in the Buddhist account of the Bodhisattva’s path."

What does "nondual" mean?

no, does not mean that at all. Nondual means that Everything is One. There is no separate existence apart from the One.

What is the flower concept in Christianity?

Most of the rewards are somehow related to power or rank (over nations, over angels, …). Edit: The flower concept is a reference to the promise, the future.

What does it mean to be apart from God in the Bible?

In christianity, there is God, and be apart from God. Most of the concepts in the Bible arise from the idea of being apart from God. An example of this is the first two chapters of the Book Of Wisdom in the bible, when referring to the people with no God.

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How do Taoists and Christians differ?

We’ve seen that philosophical Taoism and biblical Christianity differ on the nature of ultimate reality. Taoists view ultimate reality (i.e. the Tao) as an impersonal force that brought the universe into being. Christians view ultimate reality (i.e. God) as the personal Creator of the universe. The law of non-contradiction says it’s impossible for ultimate reality to be both personal and impersonal at the same time and in the same sense. Thus, if one of these views is true, the other certainly must be false.

What is the meaning of Taoism?

In philosophical Taoism, “Tao” is the term used to signify ultimate reality. “Tao is that reality . . . that existed prior to and gave rise to all other things, including Heaven and Earth and everything upon or within them.” {9} For this reason one might initially think that what a Taoist means by the Tao is virtually synonymous with what the Christian means by God. But is this really so?

What is the main object of Taoism?

The chief object of philosophical Taoism “is to live in a way that conserves life’s vitality by not expending it in useless, draining ways, the chief of which are friction and conflict.” {4} One does this by living in harmony with the Tao, or Way, of all things: the way of nature, of society, and of oneself. Taoist philosophers have a particular concept that characterizes action in harmony with the Tao. They call it wu-wei. Literally this means “non-action,” but practically speaking it means taking no action that is contrary to nature. Thus, “action in the mode of wu-wei is action in which friction — in interpersonal relationships, in intra-psychic conflict, and in relation to nature — is reduced to the minimum.” {5}

What are the attributes of a person?

First, personal beings (like men and women) possess such attributes as intellect, emotion, and will. That is, they have the ability to think, feel, and take considered action. An impersonal principle can do none of these things. In addition, a personal being has the ability to form and maintain relationships with other persons. But again, this is something that an impersonal force simply cannot do. If a cause must always be greater than the effect it produces, then does it make more sense to believe that the ultimate cause of human persons is personal or impersonal?

Where did Taoism originate?

The philosophy of Taoism is traditionally held to have originated in China with a man named Lao-tzu. Although most scholars doubt that he was an actual historical figure, tradition dates his life from 604-517 B.C. The story goes that Lao-tzu, “saddened by his people’s disinclination to cultivate the natural goodness he advocated,” {1} decided to head west and abandon civilization. As he was leaving, the gatekeeper asked if he would write down his teachings for the benefit of society. Lao-tzu consented, retired for a few days, and returned with a brief work called Tao-Te Ching, “The Classic of the Way and Its Power.” {2} It “contains 81 short chapters describing the meaning of Tao and how one should live according to the Tao.” {3} The term Tao is typically translated into English as “way”, but it can also be translated as “path,” “road” or “course.”

What is Probe Ministries?

Probe Ministries is a non-profit ministry whose mission is to assist the church in renewing the minds of believers with a Christian worldview and to equip the church to engage the world for Christ. Probe fulfills this mission through our Mind Games conferences for youth and adults, our 3-minute daily radio program, and our extensive Web site at www.probe.org.

Who is the most important representative of Taoism?

After Lao-tzu, the most important representative of philosophical Taoism was a man named Chuang-tzu, believed to have lived sometime between 399-295 B.C. He is the author of a text called the Chuang Tzu. While the thought of these two men is certainly different, there are also important similarities. One of these concerns the relationship of the Tao to the physical universe. In words reminiscent of Tao-Te Ching, the Chuang Tzu declares, “Before heaven and earth came into being, Tao existed by itself from all time. . . . It created heaven and earth.” {10}

AletheiaRivers

This is a quote from a blog I found when doing a net search on "Christian Taoist". The writer is a vicar in the Church of England.

earl

Only book re Taoism I have is the one by Alan Watts, "Tao: the Watercourse Way."

Lolly

This is the stuff that I find both fascinating and intuitively sensible. I do not know much about taoism but am given to understand that zen and tao do share a lot of common wisdom. The idea of a changing God, or perhaps a God that manifests, in one way, as change, is not problematic for me.

WindDancer

"and that there’s a constant dance of yin and yang which moves the universe, and as soon as things reach one extreme, they already include the seed of the change to move back to the other."

North

The dynamic aspect of God (A God who risks) is something discussed in the Openness Theology. Read some of Dr. Greg Boyd’s works. He is an evangelical but has had a rough ride from his evangelical brethern who see it as akin to heresy.

BrotherRog

Colorado, U.S.A., North America, Western Hemisphere, Earth, our Solar System, Milky Way, …

BrotherRog

Colorado, U.S.A., North America, Western Hemisphere, Earth, our Solar System, Milky Way, …