are the alt right christians

are the alt right christians插图

Anti-Christian
The alt-right isanti-Christian. Not by implication or insinuation,but by confession. Its leading thinkers flaunt their rejection of Christianity and their desire to convert believers away from it.

What should a Christian know about the alt-right?

Here is what every Christian should know about the alt-right: What is the alt-right? The alt-right—short for “alternative right”—is an umbrella term for a host of disparate nationalist and populist groups associated with the white identity cause/movement.

What is the alt right and what do they believe?

As alt right leader Vox Day says, “The Alt Right does not believe in the general supremacy of any race, nation, people, or sub-species. Every race, nation, people, and human sub-species has its own unique strengths and weaknesses, and possesses the sovereign right to dwell unmolested in the native culture it prefers.”.

Why is the alt-right anti-gospel?

The alt-right is anti-gospel because to embrace white identity requires rejecting the Christian identity. The Christian belongs to a “chosen race” (1 Peter 2:9), the elect from every tribe and tongue (Rev. 7:9).

Is Christianity a foundational pillar of the alt-right?

Some on the alt-right ( such as Vox Day) claim that Christianity is a “foundational pillar” of the movement. But what they mean by Christianity is often a heretical form ( Day rejects the Trinity ), a racialized version of the faith (e.g., the Kinist movement), or “religion as culture” (Spencer says he is both an atheist and a “culture Christian”).

How should Christians respond to the alt-right?

At the core of the alt-right movement is idolatry—the idol of “whiteness.” In building their identity on shared genetic traits the alt-right divides humanity and leads people away from the only source of true identity: Jesus Christ.

Why does the alt-right hate conservative Christians?

As many conservative Christians on social media can attest, the alt-right seems to have a particular disdain for gospel-centered Christianity. (For examples see here, here, here, and here .) Some on the alt-right ( such as Vox Day) claim that Christianity is a “foundational pillar” of the movement. But what they mean by Christianity is often a heretical form ( Day rejects the Trinity ), a racialized version of the faith (e.g., the Kinist movement), or “religion as culture” (Spencer says he is both an atheist and a “culture Christian”). The true religion of the alt-right is white identitarianism, which is why the SBC accurately considers it an “anti-gospel” movement.

What is the alt-right?

The alt-right—short for “alternative right”—is an umbrella term for a host of disparate nationalist and populist groups associated with the white identity cause/movement. The term brings together white supremacists (e.g., neo-Nazis), religious racialists (e.g., Kinists ), neo-pagans (e.g., Heathenry ), internet trolls (e.g., 4chan’s /pol/ ), and others enamored with white identity and racialism.

Where did the term “alt-right” come from?

In December 2008, Paul Gottfried wrote an article for Taki’s Magazine titled, “ The Decline and Rise of the Alternative Right .” (The article itself does not use the phrase “alternative right,” and the editor of the magazine at that time, Richard Spencer, claims to have added the title.)

What does Jared Taylor mean by white identity?

And the alt-right leader Jared Taylor defines “white identity” as “a recognition by whites that they have interests in common that must be defended. All other racial groups take this for granted, that it’s necessary to band together along racial lines to work together for common interests.”.

What was the alternative right?

At the time, the “alternative right” was loosely associated with “paleoconservatives” (another term created by Gottfried). Paleocons were self-identified conservatives who rejected the neo-conservatism of the George W. Bush-era.

Why is the alt right anti-Gospel?

The alt-right is anti-gospel because to embrace white identity requires rejecting the Christian identity. The Christian belongs to a “chosen race” ( 1 Peter 2:9 ), the elect from every tribe and tongue ( Rev. 7:9 ). “The chosen race is not black or white or red or yellow or brown,” John Piper says.

What was Buckley’s goal?

His goal was to establish an articulate, reasonable standard-bearer for a conservative movement. To achieve that goal Buckley had to distance conservatism from two pretenders: radical libertarianism, represented by Ayn Rand, and (usually antisemitic) conspiracism, represented by the John Birch Society.

What did Hayek point out about the road to serfdom?

Friedrich Hayek pointed out the connection between political and economic freedom in The Road to Serfdom. These were learned men. Each wrote many works, but ordinary readers found them challenging. To flourish, conservatism needed a popularizer.

Is Angeli a shaman?

Angeli considers himself to be a shaman—a pagan priest. This commitment to paganism is obviously incompatible with Christianity; this display of sheer looniness is at odds with any thoughtful conservatism. Disorder. The first generation of modern conservatives emphasized that order must precede liberty.

Is the alt right white?

The alt-right is very white. It looks at other ethnicities with condescension, suspicion, and contempt. Much of the alt-right is openly hostile toward people of color. It is hard to say where the alt-right ends and where white supremacy movements begin. The alt-right is also laced with antisemitism and anti-Zionism.

Is nationalism bad for the country?

Patriotism (the love of one’s country) is a good thing. Even nationalism (seeking the interests of one’s country) is not necessarily bad. There is a kind of exclusivist nationalism, however, that is dominated by xenophobia and is callous about the damage that self-seeking interest can do to others.

Is the alt right a visceral reaction?

Visceral reaction. Much of the alt-right is motivated and dominated by visceral reaction, rely ing less on thoughtful argument and more on screeds and memes. In moments of true emergency, visceral reactions may be useful, but as a way of life they are dangerous. Most people cannot think while they are reacting.

Is the alt right systematic?

The alt-right is not particularly systematic. Second, the alt-right objects to many things that any reasonable person should find objectionable. The press really is biased. Illegal immigration really is a threat. Politicians really are trying to take away your guns. Voter fraud really does take place.

Schedule

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. The Past: Historical Precedents, Origins, and Influences
Damon Berry, St. Lawrence University
Shaun Casey, Berkley Center (moderator)
Dorothy Kim, Brandeis University
Aristotle Papanikolaou, Fordham University Orthodox Christian Studies Center

Image Gallery

Shaun Casey starts the panel on the alt-right’s origins, featuring Aristotle Papanikolaou, Dorothy Kim, and Damon Berry.

Participants

Damon Berry is an assistant professor of religious studies at St. Lawrence University, where his research centers on how racial and religious discourses impact logics of exclusion and violence. He has also explored anti-Muslim ideology and the intersection of new religious movements and ethics.

What is the alt-right?

The alt-right—short for “alternative right”—is an umbrella term for a host of disparate nationalist and populist groups associated with the white identity cause/movement. The term brings together white supremacists (e.g., neo-Nazis), religious racialists (e.g., Kinists ), neo-pagans (e.g., Heathenry ), Internet trolls (e.g., 4chan’s /pol/ ), and others enamored with white identity and racialism.

Where did the term “alt-right” come from?

In December 2008, Paul Gottfried wrote an article for Taki’s Magazine titled “ The Decline and Rise of the Alternative Right .” (The article itself does not use the phrase “alternative right,” and the editor of the magazine at that time, Richard Spencer, claims to have added the title.)

Who is Richard Spencer?

Richard Spencer is a white nationalist who has become the public face of the alt-right.

Why does the alt-right hate conservative Christians?

As many conservative Christians on social media can attest, the alt-right seems to have a particular disdain for gospel-centered Christianity. (For examples see here , here , here and here .) Some on the alt-right ( such as Vox Day) claim that Christianity is a “foundational pillar” of the movement. But what they mean by Christianity is often a heretical form ( Day rejects the Trinity ), a racialized version of the faith (e.g., the Kinist movement), or “religion as culture” (Spencer says he is both an atheist and a “culture Christian”). The true religion of the alt-right is white identitarianism, which is why the SBC accurately considers it an “anti-gospel” movement.

How should Christians respond to the alt-right?

At the core of the alt-right movement is idolatry—the idol of “whiteness.” In building their identity on shared genetic traits the alt-right divides humanity and leads people away from the only source of true identity: Jesus Christ.

What is SQLSTATE 42000?

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What is the view of Wallace?

In Wallace’s view, Christianity always follows the dominant culture. The mainline American churches once accepted slavery and segregation, but now they denounce them. They once rejected abortion, divorce, and homosexuality, but now they accept them. Wallace’s conclusion: “The churches accommodate and echo whatever is the political mainstream.” For the moment, they “are conforming to political correctness in condemning the Alt-Right as uniquely evil,” but in the long run, “the Alt-Right shouldn’t get hung up on being anti-Christian because Christianity is infinitely malleable.”

Is race realism compatible with Christianity?

Wallace declares that “race realism”—the unifying confession of the alt-right movement—is compatible with Christianity rightly understood. “If you are Alt-Right,” he says, reciting a formula of Richard Spencer’s, “you believe that race exists, race matters and race is the foundation of identity. There are Alt-Right atheists, Alt-Right agnostics, Alt-Right pagans and Alt-Right Christians.” Only liberalized “modern Christianity” is “inherently incompatible with White identity.” The problem with American society, Wallace opines, is that Jews have “dethroned [Christianity] as the dominant culture” through “the universities and the mass media,” which they “hijacked” some time in “the early twentieth century.”

Is Hunter Wallace anti-Christian?

I am not anti-Christian. I’m a Lutheran,” says Hunter Wallace, an alt-right blogger cited in Matthew Rose’s essay from our March issue, “ The Anti-Christian Alt-Right .” Wallace’s objection is representative of many of the responses we’ve received to Rose’s essay. He may have misunderstood the author’s intention: not to argue that everyone associated with the alt-right is explicitly anti-Christian, but to point out that their intellectual sources and ideas are anti-Christian at heart. Yet Wallace hardly makes a convincing case for his own orthodoxy (if he ever intended it), and in failing to do so he corroborates the essay’s thesis that those who ascribe the achievements of Western culture to race rather than providence have chosen Faust over Christ.

Who is Connor Grubaugh?

Connor Grubaugh is assistant editor of First Things.