are the franks the christians in the first crusade

are the franks the christians in the first crusade插图

Guarded by formidable castles, the Crusader states retained the upper hand in the region until around 1130, when Muslim forces began gaining ground in their own holy war (or jihad) against the Christians, whom they called“Franks.”

What was the First Crusade?

The First Crusade was a religious campaign launched by European Christians in 1095 CE in order to recapture the Holy Land from the Muslims. This campaign has been studied by historians for many years, and there is still much debate over why it actually happened.

How did the First Crusade affect the Jews?

The First Crusade was almost exclusively French. In fact, they were called the Frankish knights. They despoiled the great Jewish communities of Speyers, Worms and Mainz. Besides the thousands of Jews killed, others thousands were forcibly converted. It was the first time in Europe that there was a mass forcible conversion of Jews.

Did the Crusades wreak havoc?

Nevertheless, they did wreak much havoc along the way and the main reason is because the Crusades marked the first time in the history of Europe that an army was assembled for a purely religious reason. That is vital to understand. That is the turning point here.

What groups were involved in the Crusades?

The Crusades set the stage for several religious knightly military orders, including the Knights Templar, the Teutonic Knights, and the Hospitallers. These groups defended the Holy Land and protected pilgrims traveling to and from the region. Did you know?

How did the Crusaders influence the local population?

The Crusaders’ situation encouraged interaction with the local population and even assimilation. They needed the food, supplies, and services available in the Muslim towns. Like their Christian counterparts in Spain, they took advantage of the enemy’s superior skills, in medicine and hygiene, for example. Because warfare was seasonal and occasional, they spent much of their time in peaceful interaction with their non-Christian counterparts. Some early-generation Crusaders intermarried with Arab Muslims or Arab Christians and adopted their personal habits and tastes, much to the dismay of Christian latecomers. An intriguing account of life in Syria during the Crusades can be found in the Kitāb al-I?tibār (“Book of Reflection”), the memoirs of Usāmah ibn Munqidh (1095–1188). Born in Syria, he was a small boy when the first generation of Franks controlled Jerusalem. As an adult, he fought with Saladin (?alā? al-Dīn Yūsuf ibn Ayyūb) and lived to see him unite Egypt with Syria and restore Jerusalem to Muslim control. In this fine example of Islamicate autobiographical writing, Usāmah draws a picture of the Crusades not easily found in European sources: Christians and Muslims observing, and sometimes admiring, each others’ skills and habits, from the battlefield to the bathhouse. Although the Franks in Syria were clearly influenced by the Muslims, the Crusades seem to have contributed relatively little to the overall impact of Islamicate culture on Europe, even though they constituted the most prolonged direct contact.

What was Pope Urban II’s call for the Crusades?

The call for the Crusades. At the Council of Clermont in 1095 Pope Urban II responded to an appeal from the Byzantine emperor for help against the Seljuq Turks, who had expanded into western Anatolia just as the Kipchak Turks in the Ukraine had cut off newly Christian Russia from Byzantium.

Did the Crusaders fight against the Muslims?

Although the Crusaders never formed a united front against the Muslims, Syrian Muslims did eventually form a united front against them, largely through the efforts of the family of the emir Zangī, a Turkic slave officer appointed Seljuq representative in Mosul in 1127. After Zangī had extended his control through northern Syria, one of his sons and successors, Nūr al-Dīn ( Nureddin ), based at Aleppo, was able to tie Zangī’s movement to the frontier warrior ( ghāzī) spirit. This he used to draw together urban and military support for a jihad against the Christians. After taking Damascus, he established a second base in Egypt. He offered help to the failing Fā?imid regime in return for being allowed to place one of his own lieutenants, Saladin, as chief minister to the Fā?imid caliph, thus warding off a Crusader alliance with the Fā?imids. This action gave Nūr al-Dīn two fronts from which to counteract the superior seaborne and naval support the Crusaders were receiving from western Europe and the Italian city-states. Three years before Nūr al-Dīn’s death in 1174, Saladin substituted himself for the Fā?imid caliph he theoretically served, thus ending more than 200 years of Fā?imid rule in Egypt. When Nūr al-Dīn died, Saladin succeeded him as head of the whole movement. When Saladin died in 1193, he had recaptured Jerusalem (1187) and begun the reunification of Egypt and Syria; his successors were known, after his patronymic, as the Ayyūbids. The efforts of a contemporary ?Abbāsid caliph, al-Nā?ir, to revive the caliphate seem pale by comparison.

Why did the Crusaders spend so much of their time with their non-Christian counterparts?

Because warfare was seasonal and occasional, they spent much of their time in peaceful interaction with their non-Christian counterparts. Some early-generation Crusaders intermarried with Arab Muslims or Arab Christians and adopted their personal habits and tastes, much to the dismay of Christian latecomers.

Who ruled Egypt and Syria?

The Ayyūbids ruled in Egypt and Syria until around 1250, when they were replaced first in Egypt and later in Syria by the leaders of their own slave-soldier corps, the Mamlūks. It was they who expelled the remaining Crusaders from Syria, subdued the remaining Nizārī Ismā?īlīs there, and consolidated Ayyūbid holdings into a centralized state. That state became strong enough in its first decade to do what no other Muslim power could: in 1260 at ?Ayn Jālūt, south of Damascus, the Mamlūk army defeated the recently arrived Mongols and expelled them from Syria.

Was Seljuq strong?

Seljuq control, never strong, was then insignificant; local Muslim rule was anarchic; the Seljuq regime in Baghdad was competing with the Fā?imid regime in Egypt; and all parties in Syria were the target of the Nizārī Ismā?īlī movement at Alamūt.

Where is the book of reflection from the Crusades?

An intriguing account of life in Syria during the Crusades can be found in the Kitāb al-I?tibār (“Book of Reflection”), the memoirs of Usāmah ibn Munqidh (1095–1188). Born in Syria, he was a small boy when the first generation of Franks controlled Jerusalem.

What was the Seljuq policy?

Seljuq policy, originally directed southward against the Fā?imids of Egypt, was increasingly diverted by the pressure of Turkmen raids into Anatolia and Byzantine Armenia. A Byzantine army was defeated and Emperor Romanus IV Diogenes was captured at Manzikert in 1071, and Christian Asia Minor was thereby opened to eventual Turkish occupation. Meanwhile, many Armenians south of the Caucasus migrated south to join others in the region of the Taurus Mountains and to form a colony in Cilicia.

What was the economic revival of the First Crusade?

An economic revival was also in full swing well before the First Crusade; forestlands were being cleared , frontiers pushed forward , and markets organized. Moreover, Italian shipping was beginning to challenge the Muslim predominance in the Mediterranean. Especially significant for the Crusade was a general overhaul of the ecclesiastical structure …

What was the importance of Western Europe in the 11th century?

Thus it was that in the closing years of the 11th century western Europe was abounding in energy and confidence . What is more, as is evident in achievements such as the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, Europeans possessed the capacity to launch a major military undertaking at the very time the Seljuq Turks, one of several tribes on the northeastern frontier of the Muslim world who had embraced Islam in the 11th century, were beginning to move south and west into Iran and beyond with all the enthusiasm of a new convert.

What was the idea of the Holy War?

Tied to this idea was the notion that war to defend Christendom was not only a justifiable undertaking but a holy work and therefore pleasing to God. Closely associated with this Western concept of holy war was another popular religious practice, pilgrimage to a holy shrine.

How did the Crusades affect the world?

The social effect of religious belief at the time was complex: religion was moved by tales of signs and wonders , and it attributed natural disasters to supernatural intervention.

What was Western Europe made of?

It was composed of several kingdoms loosely describable as feudal. While endemic private warfare, brigandage, and problems associated with vassalage …

Where were the three major pilgrimages?

Eleventh-century Europe abounded in local shrines housing relics of saints, but three great centres of pilgrimage stood out above the others: Rome, with the tombs of Saints Peter and Paul; Santiago de Compostela, in northwestern Spain; and Jerusalem, with the Holy Sepulchre of Jesus Christ ’s entombment.

What would happen if the Crusades were based on Islamic narratives?

Suleiman Mourad: If we wrote the history of the Crusades based on Islamic narratives, it would be a completely different story altogether . There were no doubt wars and bloodshed, but that wasn’t the only or dominant story. There was also coexistence, political compromise, trade, scientific exchange, love.

What did the templars represent to Muslims?

SM: The Templars represented to the Muslims a model blending religiosity and militancy that was novel. To give a modern parallel, they were perceived not unlike the way Muslims today might think of Isis: that they are too fanatic for their taste. They bring to their fighting a kind of religious zeal, and they bring to their religion a kind of militancy.

What is the holiest place in the Mediterranean?

Jerusalem was one of the holiest places in the eastern Mediterranean—for Muslims, Christians and Jews alike. (Credit: Photo12/UIG/Getty Images)

What is the view of the medieval Islamic world?

The medieval Islamic world’s view of the west is a mirror of today’s view of Islam by the west: exotic and distant, populated by a fanatical warlike population, slow to develop, economically backwards—with nice monuments and raw materials, but otherwise not much to recommend it.

What is the holiest city in Islam?

PC: Jerusalem, one of Islam’s holiest cities after Mecca and Medina, was one of its most pious pilgrimage sites. Islamic tradition built on many Christian traditions and revered many of the same figures known from the Bible and elsewhere—including Jesus.

What was the main accomplishment of the Muslim world?

The main accomplishment was when, on a large scale, Muslims began to creatively engage with the science and philosophy of the classical Greco-Roman-Byzantine tradition—and began to rethink those ideas. For pretty much the whole apparatus of science, mathematics and logic, Muslim scholars, along with others based in the Muslim world, provided corrections to the Greco-Roman tradition.

Where did the Frankish attack take place?

PC: Muslims saw the Frankish threat as Mediterranean-wide. It’s not just Franks invading Jerusalem, holding it 87 years and leaving, but a long-term and consistent assault on the most exposed areas of the Mediterranean edge of Muslim world—Spain, Sicily, North Africa, and what is now Turkey—over hundreds of years.

Why was the Crusade so good?

The men were killed, the women were raped, the children were sold into slavery and all the plunder that could be taken was taken. That is one of the reasons that a Crusade was such a good idea. The Pope wanted to get the knights out of Europe. It was essential to move them away somewhere.

What was the first crusade?

The First Crusade. The major watershed of Jewish history in the medieval world is the First Crusade. The Crusades changed all of Jewish life in Europe. It changed the attitude of Christians towards Jews and Jews toward Christians… and even Jews towards Jews.

How long did it take the Crusaders to reach the Holy Land?

It took two years for the Crusaders to reach the Holy Land.

Why did Peter the Hermit preach the Crusades?

A preacher named Peter the Hermit said that all the troubles were rooted in the fact that the Holy Land was in the hands of non-believers, the Muslims. If somehow that situation could be rectified the world would settle into peace and tranquility. Therefore, he preached the Crusades and the Pope gave it his blessing.

How many people survived the Crusade?

In the year 1095, the Crusade was preached by Pope Urban II and Peter the Hermit. The estimates are that over 60,000 men took up the call. However, only 15,000 survived the trek and reached Jerusalem. It was a long, dangerous journey in a time of plague, hunger and war.

What was the first estate in the Middle Ages?

The first estate was knighthood, the noblemen. The second estate was the clergy.

What was the idea of Urban II?

His idea was to raise a Christian army that would be under the command of the Pope.

What Were the Crusades?

By the end of the 11th century, Western Europe had emerged as a significant power in its own right, though it still lagged behind other Mediterranean civilizations, such as that of the Byzantine Empire (formerly the eastern half of the Roman Empire) and the Islamic Empire of the Middle East and North Africa.

What was the name of the battle that Saladin fought in?

In 1187, Saladin began a major campaign against the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem. His troops virtually destroyed the Christian army at the battle of Hattin, taking back the important city along with a large amount of territory.

How many Crusaders were there?

Four armies of Crusaders were formed from troops of different Western European regions, led by Raymond of Saint-Gilles, Godfrey of Bouillon, Hugh of Vermandois and Bohemond of Taranto (with his nephew Tancred). These groups departed for Byzantium in August 1096.

What did the Crusades do to the Church?

Those who joined the armed pilgrimage wore a cross as a symbol of the Church. The Crusades set the stage for several religious knightly military orders, including the Knights Templar, the Teutonic Knights, and the Hospitallers. These groups defended the Holy Land and protected pilgrims traveling to and from the region.

Why were the Crusades important?

What Were the Crusades? The Crusades were a series of religious wars between Christians and Muslims started primarily to secure control of holy sites considered sacred by both groups.

Why did Pope Urban II send envoys to Pope Urban II?

In 1095, Alexius sent envoys to Pope Urban II asking for mercenary troops from the West to help confront the Turkish threat. Though relations between Christians in the East and West had long been fractious, Alexius’s request came at a time when the situation was improving.

How did the Crusades affect trade?

Trade and transportation also improved throughout Europe as a result of the Crusades. The wars created a constant demand for supplies and transportation, which resulted in ship-building and the manufacturing of various supplies.